Heat Wave

The weather this week has been brutally hot for mid-May. It’s been in the 80’s and we humans and the chickens aren’t quite used to it. We’ve been moving the Buff Orpingtons around to keep them on fresh grass. On the first really hot day, Grace and Matthew noticed that where we had them penned up against the brooding house and yard, they had little to no shade during the middle portion of the day. A few of the buffs were taking shelter in the coop, but I it was too hot in there for all of them to crowd in out of the sun. They had taken to trying to dig underneath of the coop  and laying on their backs in whatever shade they could find and sticking their feet up in the air. Not a good sign. My solution was to grab a tarp, attach one side to the broody house run and stake the other side to the ground. It made a very effective sun shade for the chickens.

chicken shade

When we moved them around the peach tree in the back yard I took the step in plastic posts that we used with the snow fencing, turned two of them up side down to prop the tarp in the middle and used four more posts to hold down each corner. It makes a really nice pup tent for the chickens.

chicken tent

They seem to think so anyway.

chicken tent - close

I got a hanging scale so I could weigh and mark the buff roosters for either eating or keeping. I gave all the roosters a pretty anklet.  A thin green one if they are destined for the stewpot and a thicker puce green band if we are keeping them. I marked 12 roosters for the stew pot and the 4 heaviest roosters to keep. That’s right, the final tally of pullets (hens that aren’t laying yet) to cockerels (young roosters) is 9 pullets and 16 cockerels and one fluffy black cochin cockerel.

With this hot weather, the hens have been laying a lot better recently. We’ve been getting 12-14 eggs a day from our 14 hens that are laying at the moment (the broody hen is not laying). So, at the moment, we have a surplus of eggs. So today I fed a little over two dozen eggs, mixed with feed, to the different flocks of birds. They all really liked the treat.

Hens eat eggsNHDE eat eggs

As you can see in the picture above, we have put the New Hampshire and Delaware chicks out in the run. They seem to be enjoying themselves a lot, but they aren’t quite sure of what to make of it. I had to grab each one and put them out the door because they didn’t want to leave the coop at first. I wanted to get them outside because it is cooler in the shade outside than it is in the coop. Both groups of chicks are feathering out nicely. They aren’t even 4 weeks old yet and their bodies are mostly feathered. They feathered out more quickly than the buffs did that’s for sure.

One thing that makes me happy is we definitely have at least one New Hampshire rooster. At first I thought that we had all pullets, but there is no mistaking it with that big red comb and wattle development. This guy is a cockerel. This means we’ll be able to hatch purebred New Hampshires without buying any more chickens.

NH roo

I don’t have any pictures of the broody hen, as the pictures would look much like any of the other pictures I’ve taken of her. She is still sitting strong and she is now on day 17 of 21. We should have new chicks some time the middle of next week. I tried candling an egg today to see if I could detect if the chick has grown some more. I couldn’t see anything except the air sac in the egg. I think the chick has gotten too big to allow light through.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s