Yard Hay

I made a very neat discovery this week. After I mow the lawn, I usually rake up the grass clippings and throw them into the brooding house run for the Delaware and New Hampshire chicks. However, when I mowed the lawn on Monday, I was too tired to rake up the clippings. By time I got around to raking up the grass clippings on Wednesday, the grass had dried out.

dried grass

It was so much easier to rake up, move around, and throw to the chicks without all that excess water weight.

yard hay

It also makes great filler for our nest boxes. It isn’t slippery like the straw we had been using and sticks around in the box much longer.

Yard hay in nest box

Our garden is also doing very well, I was able to harvest about a pound of kale on Saturday, but the weeds where starting to take over. I’m very glad we got started plants because that is the only way they were able to stay ahead of the weeds.

Garden before mulch

Over the long weekend, I was able to mulch 2/3rds of the garden and it looks much better. I didn’t put down cardboard between the plants, but we haven’t had much luck with the cardboard and mulch method. So this is intended to suppress the weeds enough that we can keep up with what weeds do get through.

Garden after mulch

Among the weeds, I did find, what I think is a volunteer sunflower. I decided to mulch around it as well and let it grow.

Volunteer Sunflower

Over the weekend, we also released our laying hens and the leghorn cross rooster (whom we have dubbed Alfredo) into the yard with the buff orpingtons. Several of the hens had escaped from the PVC run and they were pecking and scratching around the yard quite contentedly and were happy to ignore the buffs for the most part. So, we decided to free the hens and Alfredo and see what happened. Alfredo was quite dismayed at the change and took to guarding his hens very carefully. However, there is now less fighting between the buff roosters. When ever there is a tiff between them and they make a lot of noise, Alfredo chases them down and puts a stop to it.

Hens in ten

One change we did have to make because of adding Alfredo to the mix was we moved the Black Cochin rooster (dubbed Molasses, because he isn’t very fast and he is black) out into the PVC run with 4 of the buff pullets because Alfredo was beating up on him very badly. I noticed on Tuesday, that any time Alfredo spotted Molasses outside of the grow-out coop he would viciously chase down and attack him. I believe Alfredo would do the same with the buff roosters if he could, but the buffs are faster than he is and can lose him. Not so with poor Molasses. He is very slow and non-aggressive and Alfredo took advantage of that. Once, I saw Molasses dive underneath the grow-out coop and Alfredo followed him underneath and was pulling feathers out of his tail. On Wednesday, I didn’t see Molasses outside of the coop at all. When I pulled Molasses out of the coop, he had NOTHING in his crop. So, we moved the PVC run outside of the electric fence, put Molasses and the buff pullets in it. We added a large plastic dog kennel with straw bedding to the run to shut them in for the night to keep them safe from predators, but that wasn’t big enough for long-term. So, today, I built a 3ft by 3ft wire bottom coop with perches (like the chickshaw, or the grow-out coop) from left over building materials we had on hand. Most of the frame came from the old rooster tractor, which Matthew completely dismantled earlier this week. The siding and door was left over from building the original chicken coop (now the brooding house). We had the wire on hand from other projects and the roof also came from the old rooster tractor. I didn’t even have to cut the roofing at all. It was the perfect size. I made the middle roof rafter a foot longer than it needed to be. This leaves 6 inch handles on either side of the coop so that it can be easily moved.

small coop

Molasses and the pullets seem very happy wit their new setup. This setup will be incredibly handy for isolating sick or picked on birds and if I add nest boxes to the coop it will work very well for isolating a selected breeding group.

small coop and run

In other farm news, My mom has moved horses to the farm. She is very excited. It has been a life long dream of her’s to have horses on her own property. We had some excitement after they arrived. The fence is usually charged down by Bobby’s house, but for some reason it wasn’t working and Bobby was out of town for Memorial Day. We came up with a temporary solution of running a wire from the paddock fencing, across the driveway, and linking it to the electric fence around the garden. It worked very well until Bobby fixed the issue when he got back.

Just a note to anyone that might be concerned. What the horses have on their noses in the picture are grazing muzzles. The field had knee high grass in it, and horses that aren’t used to getting that much grass can eat themselves sick, even to death. This is only a temporary measure for the next few weeks until they get used to the grass. They get about 6 hours a day where they can graze without the muzzles, and they can drink just fine with the muzzles on.

horses

The horses have settled in very well, however, they still aren’t sure if they like that Bobby’s cows are in the field across the road.

Mama and her babies are also doing fine. We found out yesterday how good of a mama she actually is. My dad and mom were coming back from a walk with their dogs and I asked my dad if he wanted to see the chicks. He, my mom, and the dogs came around the house with me. Mama hen was in the brooder tote with her babies, so I lifted the lid of the run so I could access the tote to get a chick to show to my dad. While I wasn’t looking, my parents’ dog, Cricket (a cockapoo-dachshund with a fairly high prey drive) comes up to the run and starts sniffing. We then hear a piercing screech and I see Mama fly out of the tote and try to attack Cricket through the wire of the run. Cricket practically tumbles end over end to get away from Mama and hides behind my dad. It is nice to know that she is a mama that will attack a predator for her babies. More and more, I believe she will be a chicken that we keep around for a good, long time. She is so good with her babies. She even gives them “chicken back rides”.

riding mama

Tonight, we moved the electric netting paddock to a new area. They had been in the previous spot for a week and did a pretty good job of clearing it up. I had to use a weed wacker to knock down some of the taller weeds so they could finish eating them, but they did a good job. We moved them behind and to the side of my parents’ garage because there is a drainage ditch that is overgrown behind the garage and it is hard to get it cleared up. I just used a weed wacker to clear a path through the overgrown weeds on the ditch and we  encompassed about 1/4th of the ditch. The chickens were enjoying going through the tall weeds. Hopefully this lasts them until next week even though this is a slightly smaller area than last time.

Run behind garage

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s