Returning Home

Saturday morning, David C., our son Mr. G and I left to make a 6 day visit to the big city we left. The main goal was to spend 3 days visiting the ball of my “golden chain”, but we also left early so we could have Sunday to visit with friends and go to our old church. Some of you may be wondering what the “golden chain” I’m talking about is. It is a term that a famous permaculture farmer, Joel Salatin, used to describe a job that keeps you tied to a suburban or urban life. Fortunately, my golden chain is long enough to reach almost 300 miles and flexible enough that I can still easily do farm work, care for my son, and not feel too confined by it (usually). The trip went well, work wise, but dealing with a baby who got sick on the trip (which caused major sleep deprivation), sleeping in a strange bed, driving in city traffic, and being away from home really took a toll on us all. Thursday morning, we were just ready to get home. Once we arrived home, the first thing I did, after unloading the baby, was catch a rooster who had gotten loose and collect the eggs. It was so good to be home.

Later that evening, I found a great way to catch a hormonal, teenage rooster. We had accidentally left the poultry netting off so I came outside to find 2 buff roosters and a buff hen circling the run where Molasses and a few of the buff hens were being kept. I tried to catch a rooster first, but he was too quick. So I went after the hen. She cornered herself between the coop and the PVC run and she was easy to grab. The rooster, was still nearby so I thought I would try to grab him as well. He was wary, but the hen started squawking and he forgot I was there and jumped on her. That made it easy to grab him and toss him back into the pen. I kept the hen in my other hand and tried it again on the second rooster. When I would get her close to the ground, she would start squawking and trying to get away. That caught the rooster’s attention and he jumped her only to be nabbed by my free hand. To catch a rooster, you only need the right bait. However, our most frequent flyer rooster has figured out the bait and grab method and is very wary of us now. Fortunately we have a plan to fix that problem.

The laying hens and the majority of the buff s have been on the same grass we put them on a little bit over a week ago. While we were gone, Matthew and Grace had been wondering why the egg count seemed to be light. The chickens did almost too good of a job on the ground near the coop, but the tall weeds in the ditch hadn’t been touched much at all. So today, I went out with a weed whacker and knocked down all the tall stuff. In the process, I found six eggs hidden in several different places in the weeds. 4 of the eggs looked to be from the same hen. The run looks much better now and we will move them further down the ditch, onto more tall weeds, tomorrow.

Run weed wacked

The run isn’t the only thing we will be moving tomorrow. We will be swapping Molasses and his girls for all the buff roosters. Today, one of the buff girls got loose from the big run and came over to visit with Molasses and the other girls. Matthew couldn’t remember how many girls we had in with Molasses, so he caught her and dropped her in with them. We have been talking about trying to confine all the buff rooster into the PVC run so they will be easier to assess for temperament and easier to catch when butchering time comes. However, the logistics of catching 16 roosters was a little daunting. But I had an idea. Since most of the buff hens were in with Molasses, we decided that it we would capture the other 4 hens, and stash them with Molasses. The theory is that tomorrow, we will take the grow out coop with the roosters, out of the paddock and to the PVC run and move the small isolation coop with the hens into the paddock. The hope is that once the pressure of having so many roosters in the pen is off, Alfredo won’t mind having Molasses back in with the flock. Our current backup plan for Molasses, if Alfredo still goes after him, is moving him in with the New Hampshire and Delaware chicks and see how that goes.

Molasses and hens

Molasses has been much happier recently and we want to make sure he doesn’t get beat up because he really is a nice, docile bird. Pretty too!

Molasses

While we were away, the Kale grew like crazy. Today, I harvested a very large stainless steel bowl full of it.

Kale harvest

We have 5 different types of Kale; red russian, two types of curly, a variety of dino kale and I can’t remember what the last one is.

5 kale leaves

After removing the stems I had three gallon sized ziplock bags of kale to freeze (we add it to soups and sauces as we don’t like the taste of fresh kale that much). The New Hampshire and Delaware chicks really enjoyed the stems.

ND kale stems

The New Hampshire and Delaware chicks are getting really grown up now. They are 6.5 weeks old and they are the busiest chicks I’ve ever seen. The New Hampshires are looking nice. I really like the darker markings in their tails and hackles.

New Hampshire 6weeks

The Delawares have feathered out much faster, more completely and are generally bigger than the New Hampshires. I like their darker markings as well.

Delaware 6weeks

While we were gone, Matthew has been working on getting rid of the wood pile that was near the brooding house run. the logs were riddled with ants and other bugs, so he threw some of them into the run so the chicks could clean them off. They were wary at first, but then got excited about logs appearing. After he moved the whole pile (except the stump) Matthew made a temporary run with 2′ high, 1/2″ chicken wire, step in stakes, zip ties, and a tarp to keep off flying predators.

ND temp run

The chicks have enjoyed scratching up the ground and eating the bugs. The run is by no means secure. We have been checking on them every half hour to an hour and putting any escapees back. I did several head counts today and they are all still there.

ND temp run ut

Mama and babies are doing very well too. She is still a great protector of her chicks, but tolerant of human interference. She puffs up and makes noises when we get close or try handling the chicks, but she doesn’t attack us, just keeps and eye and ear open to see what we are doing. I did a check for tail feathers on the chicks before we left last weekend on the theory that the first chicks to get tail feathers are pullets and we supposedly have 4 pullets out of 7 chicks. This method marks the grey chick as a pullet as well. I was concerned she may be a rooster because of the dot on her head (potentially a sex linked trait) but that doesn’t appear to be true.

Mama and 2.5 week chicks

It is so nice to be home. However, I am not particularly looking forward to the chicken chores I will have to start doing soon to whittle down the number of roosters.

 

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