Reducing the Chicken Population

The separation of the buff roosters from the flock has been successful. On Saturday afternoon, we separated the three most aggressive roosters for processing on Sunday. We had 3 left over potato towers made of 2″ by 1″ welded wire. We staked them down with plastic step in posts, covered the top with snow fencing to keep the roosters in and a tarp to keep the sun off them. Overnight, we wrapped the entire setup with 1/4″, 4 ft high hardware cloth to keep predators away from the roosters. I also pushed a perch through the wire so the roosters were more comfortable during the night. On Sunday, I successfully processed the three roosters with help from Grace and Matthew. From first cut, to putting the birds in the fridge, was about 2 hours. Setup and cleanup took a bit longer. Since the last time I processed some birds, it has become easier, I thought it would be harder since I raised these birds from chicks myself. But starting with the meanies definitely made it simpler.

rooster purgatory

The setup of having the grow-out coop attached to the PVC run works very well for assessing which roosters are the most aggressive. What ends up happening is that one to 3 of the most aggressive roosters will guard the food and water in the run and rotate hopping inside to make sure the rest of the roosters don’t come out. However, this situation doesn’t work for the long term. To prevent the more timid roosters (the ones we want to keep from being kept away from the food and water too long, we need to make sure all the roosters are kept out of the coop for a good portion of the day. To accomplish this, I use a poultry hook to pull them all out and shut the door and put a wire screen in front of the opening in the run to keep the roosters from escaping under the coop.

shut coop door

The run has plenty of shade and with so many roosters out, it is impossible for the most aggressive few to guard the food and water because they don’t have a choke point to patrol.

rooster run w tarp

After butchering, I place the wet feathers between two screens to dry. One of my sisters wants to use them for her art. However, last night, it looks as though we had a visitor who thought the feathers smelled like dead chicken.

Feather mess

We think it was a raccoon. We’ll just have to replace the screen before finishing the drying process. Fortunately, all the live feather bearers were left alone.

broken screen

When we were doing the switcheroo, we discovered that removing the buff roosters didn’t help Molasses with Alfredo at all. When we moved the buff hens and Molasses into the run with the laying hens and Alfredo, Molasses was so nervous he wouldn’t eat. When we released the laying hens and Alfredo, Molasses immediately tried to dive through the fence to get away, getting tangled.  Fortunately, the fence was off, but he started squawking and that caught Alfredo’s attention. He and two of the laying hens raced over and started viciously attacking Molasses. At that point, we decided to let Molasses feed unmolested and then move him into the run with the Delaware and New Hampshire chicks. When we first put Molasses in the run, all of the chicks ran away from him, except one New Hampshire cockerel. This little guy puffed up, squawked at him and attacked with both feet and beak. Molasses wasn’t having any of that. He puffed up squawked back and took a hunk of feathers off the little cockerel’s neck. The cockerel had the good sense to back off and Molasses didn’t pursue him. Over the next couple of hours, as long as the chicks respected his space, Molasses left them alone. By the end of the day, Molasses was laying in the dirt, having a nice dust bath, while 4 chicks groomed him. The chicks now crowd around him and look to him if anything is amiss. I’ve also seen him call to them if he finds food. He is really happy with the chicks and is enjoying himself more than I’ve ever seen.

The Chicks are growing up very quickly. Some of the cockerels have started play battling with each other.

Over the weekend, I spotted a humming bird flitting around in the rafters of my parents’ garage. It seemed like it couldn’t find its way out. On Monday morning, my dad heard a little cheep when he went out into the garage, he looked up and saw the humming bird hanging onto a nail in one of the support beams.

Hummingbird1

My mom fed this little female Ruby Throated Hummingbird with an eyedropper of nectar for hummingbird feeders. She fed it for about 2-3 hours until it could stand and perch dependably  on its own.

Hummingbird2

I helped her rig a perch around the feeder under some shade. She fed the bird every hour or so until dark, It didn’t seem to want to eat from the feeder. The bird was still there, expectantly waiting for a feeding this morning. While she was feeding it, another hummingbird kept buzzing past. When time came around for the next feeding, the hummingbird was gone. Hopefully she has the strength to survive now.

Hummingbird3

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